Les kiwis et Fonterra

Ouvert par Dairy, 25 novembre 2011

Ven 25 Nov 2011 21:14 #1

 


 


Fonterra Aims to Double China Dairy After Milk Scandal



Q









Unmature cows reside in the heifer barn at Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd.'s Tangshan farm in Tangshan, Hebei Province, China. Demand for food commodities including dairy is rising in China as economic growth lifts incomes and spurs increased sales of protein-rich meals. Photographer: Nelson Ching/Bloomberg





Nov. 25 (Bloomberg) -- Theo Spierings, chief executive officer of Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd., the world’s largest dairy exporter, talks about the company's business in China, the aftermath of the melamine scandal which caused the collapse of its local partner Sanlu Group, and the outlook for New Zealand's dairy production. He spoke with Bloomberg's Stephen Engle yesterday in Beijing. (Source: Bloomberg)





Theo Spierings, chief executive officer of Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd. Photographer: Keith Bedford/Bloomberg





Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd., the world’s largest dairy exporter, aims to double sales in China, Theo Spierings said during his first trip as chief executive officer to the nation where a 2008 tainted milk scandal led to the collapse of its local partner.


China’s dairy market will increase in value by more than 10 percent a year in the next few years and Fonterra plans to double sales by 2020, Auckland-based Spierings said in an interview on Bloomberg Television.


Fonterra, which accounts for about 40 percent of the global trade in dairy products, is expanding in China after melamine- tainted milk killed at least six infants. The ensuing investigation led to the collapse of partner Sanlu Group and the imprisonment of former chairwoman Tian Wenhua, as well as the trial and execution of two other people and a surge in the sale of imported milk.


“The scandal of a couple a years ago is pretty much imprinted on a lot of Chinese consumers’ minds,” said Michael Creed, a Melbourne-based agribusiness economist at National Australia Bank. (NAB) “If you do have a foreign-owned dairy company producing milk and milk powders or dairy products in China there’s possibly a perception that their standards may be somewhat higher.”


Consumption of food commodities including dairy is rising in China as economic growth lifts incomes and spurs increased sales of protein-rich meals. China’s demand for New Zealand milk products last year surged more than fivefold from 2008 to about 353 million kilograms, according to the company.


Double-Digit Growth


“Demand in this country is growing at double-digits, so in that sense it’s fantastic,” said Spierings, 47, in the interview aired yesterday that continued the company’s expansion in China undertaken by his predecessor. “Supply is also growing in China, but supply will not be able to cope with demand.”


China’s imports have surged after milk powder in the country was found in 2008 to be tainted with melamine, an industrial chemical. Along with the deaths, more than 54,000 were hospitalized after 22 companies including Sanlu sold formula made from contaminated milk.


Global consumption of liquid-dairy products may increase by 30 percent over the next decade as the middle classes expand in China and India, Tetra Pak Group said July 11.


“The only direction for milk demand in China is up,” National Australia’s Creed said by phone. “You do have a combination of rising per capita income and increasing westernization of the Chinese diet as well as rising protein consumption.”


Local Production


Fonterra will increase its sales through imports and also through expansion of local milk production via its three farms, Spierings said. The company agreed with Yutian county’s government in Hebei province to build a “world-class” farm, which will increase its milk production in China to about 90 million liters a year, it said July 19.


There is another farm in Hebei and one in Tangshan, which has doubled to more than 6,000 cows since it opened in 2007. Currently, the two farms are producing raw materials for other dairy makers such as Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group Co. (600887) and China Mengniu Dairy Co. (2319), Spierings said.


The melamine tainting caused the collapse of Fonterra’s local partner Sanlu and resulted in the execution of two people after a trial about their involvement in the poisonings.


Big Hit


The scandal “was a big hit for the dairy industry” in China, Spierings said. Fonterra will build a “fully integrated model in China in order to take full control of the supply chain” so that safety won’t be an issue, Spierings said.


In the aftermath of the poisonings, “consolidation of the fragmented, small producers will continue as the regulation will be tighter and tighter,” he said.


Chinese urban dwellers consumed 22.72 kilograms of dairy products per capita in 2008, up 57 percent from 2000, according to the Ministry of Agriculture. The rural population consumed only 4.81 kilograms per capita in 2008, ministry data showed. China demand will continue to “outpace its own supply and imports will grow,” Spierings said.


Spierings previously headed Dutch co-operative Royal Friesland Foods.


To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Elisabeth Behrmann in Sydney at ebehrmann1@bloomberg.net; Feiwen Rong in Beijing at frong2@bloomberg.net


To contact the editor responsible for this story: Richard Dobson at rdobson4@bloomberg.net


Want to save this for later? Add it to your Queue!

 

 

 
Ven 25 Nov 2011 21:16 #2

Dairy, ce qui est bien avec tes post c'est que l'on revise l'anglais ... parfois c'est un peu difficile et  tu ne penses à nos pauvres forumeurs comme rivarol

Ven 25 Nov 2011 21:17 #3

Fonterra  vise  l'expansion.....


La  Chine  fait  parti de  leurs  ambitions!


L'article e xplique  qu'un  chinois e n  ville  consomme  quasiment  23  jk  de  produit  lait  contre   a  peine  5 kg  dans  les  zones  rurales.


Entre  2000  et  2008  la  consommation a  augmenté  de  57%..malgré  la  crise  de  la  mélanine.


 


Fonterra  investit  directement  sur  place, en  Chine  et  possede  trois  méga  ferme  dont  l'une  d'elle qui  va  produire  90  million  de  litres  par  an.

Ven 25 Nov 2011 21:24 #4

[quote=Dairy]


Fonterra  vise  l'expansion.....


La  Chine  fait  parti de  leurs  ambitions!


L'article e xplique  qu'un  chinois e n  ville  consomme  quasiment  23  jk  de  produit  lait  contre   a  peine  5 kg  dans  les  zones  rurales.


Entre  2000  et  2008  la  consommation a  augmenté  de  57%..malgré  la  crise  de  la  mélanine.


 


Fonterra  investit  directement  sur  place, en  Chine  et  possede  trois  méga  ferme  dont  l'une  d'elle qui  va  produire  90  million  de  litres  par  an.


[/quote]


 


heureusement que le grand frère est là pour rattraper les c o n n eries du sale gosse  !!!!


 


 


lecteurs assidus de ce batracien insignifiant , il faut lire mélamine et non mélanine !!! le lien suivant va vous remettre sur le bon chemin : sciences.blog.lemonde.fr/2008/09/22/les-bebes-chinois-la-melamine-et-la-melanine/

Sam 26 Nov 2011 00:05 #5

[quote=patogaz]


 


 


heureusement que le grand frère est là pour rattraper les c o n n eries du sale gosse  !!!!


 


 


lecteurs assidus de ce batracien insignifiant , il faut lire mélamine et non mélanine !!! le lien suivant va vous remettre sur le bon chemin : sciences.blog.lemonde.fr/2008/09/22/les-bebes-chinois-la-melamine-et-la-melanine/


[/quote]


comme quoi ; il faut TOUJOURS un calife pour ratrapper un autre......   

Sam 26 Nov 2011 08:24 #6

le plus interessant sera de voir la resistance de Laita Sodial ect face à Fronterra le triplevolume va surement etre mis en place rapidement .

Sam 26 Nov 2011 08:25 #7

le plus interessant sera de voir la resistance de Laita Sodial ect face à Fronterra le triplevolume va surement etre mis en place rapidement .

Sam 26 Nov 2011 10:21 #8

[quote=pipo]


le plus interessant sera de voir la resistance de Laita Sodial ect face à Fronterra le triplevolume va surement etre mis en place rapidement .


[/quote]


A  oui  j'ai  entendu  parler d e  cela:quota  A, B  et  B  "prime"


Il  n'y a  qu'en  FRANCE  que  l'on  invente  des  systemes  comme  cela!!!!!!


Fonterra, c'est  une  vraie  coop  avec  la  transparence  ...grace   Global  dairy  trade: la  on  voit  en  live  le  marché!!!!!


   http://www.globaldairytrade.info/

Sam 26 Nov 2011 12:09 #9

[quote=Dairy]


 


A  oui  j'ai  entendu  parler d e  cela:quota  A, B  et  B  "prime"


Il  n'y a  qu'en  FRANCE  que  l'on  invente  des  systemes  comme  cela!!!!!!


Fonterra, c'est  une  vraie  coop  avec  la  transparence  ...grace   Global  dairy  trade: la  on  voit  en  live  le  marché!!!!!


   http://www.globaldairytrade.info/


[/quote]


Leur système, un prix unique, le prix B. Un vrai prix B, sans tunnel avec les voisins pour de bonnes raisons ! Et sans tergiversations et remise en cause du système chaque trimestre !


 


 


 


[Ils pourraient quand même payer une part en B+, pour le beurre exporté vers l'UE payées au prix fort ! Mais à chacun ses ambiguités !]

Sam 26 Nov 2011 12:54 #11


Complété le 26/11/2011 à 11:55 :

An douar zo re gozh evit ober goap anezhañ.
Image
Sam 26 Nov 2011 13:29 #12

[quote=patogaz]


 


 


heureusement que le grand frère est là pour rattraper les c o n n eries du sale gosse  !!!!


 


 


lecteurs assidus de ce batracien insignifiant , il faut lire mélamine et non mélanine !!! le lien suivant va vous remettre sur le bon chemin : sciences.blog.lemonde.fr/2008/09/22/les-bebes-chinois-la-melamine-et-la-melanine/


[/quote]


pas inutile cette precision qui a malheureussement echappé a la grenouille mais on lui pardonne ,dés que il voit la couleurs des Kiwi's ,il perds un peu la vision ....


dans cette histoire de mélamine les precurseurs etrangers sur le marché laitier Chinois - qui ont payé les pots casser - c'etait les Danois ...la coop Arla foods a laisser des plumes consequent avant de voir venir les Kiwi's sur ce terrain ...


deja d'un point de vue geographique il me semble logique que ce marché est facilement accessible pour  les NZ....sans parler de l'ouverture ( certes timide) des portes d'un enorme marché Indien ....

Sam 26 Nov 2011 14:09 #13

[quote=moine]


 


pas inutile cette precision qui a malheureussement echappé a la grenouille mais on lui pardonne ,dés que il voit la couleurs des Kiwi's ,il perds un peu la vision ....


dans cette histoire de mélamine les precurseurs etrangers sur le marché laitier Chinois - qui ont payé les pots casser - c'etait les Danois ...la coop Arla foods a laisser des plumes consequent avant de voir venir les Kiwi's sur ce terrain ...


deja d'un point de vue geographique il me semble logique que ce marché est facilement accessible pour  les NZ....sans parler de l'ouverture ( certes timide) des portes d'un enorme marché Indien ....


[/quote]


Si  ce  n'est  que  des  plumes, ce  n'est  rien: ca  repousse.


Par  contre  certains  responsables  chinois  y  ont  laisser  la  vie.....ils  rigolent  pas  la  bas.

Sam 26 Nov 2011 14:15 #14

[quote=moine]


 


comme quoi ; il faut TOUJOURS un calife pour ratrapper un autre......   


[/quote]ouais , mé mi l' aime bin , chtiot calife du pouéyis d' brun !!!! ilé rétu comme toute !!!!


 


salut ati , tchio calife !!!!  alé , adé , ejminvo !!!!


 


je ne suis pas vache , je traduis pour les non picardisants :


mais moi je l' aime bien , le petit calife du pays de Bray , il est gentil comme tout !!!!


salut à toi , petit calife , allez , au revoir , je m' en vais !!!!

Sam 26 Nov 2011 19:49 #15

[quote=moine]


 


pas inutile cette precision qui a malheureussement echappé a la grenouille mais on lui pardonne ,dés que il voit la couleurs des Kiwi's ,il perds un peu la vision ....


dans cette histoire de mélamine les precurseurs etrangers sur le marché laitier Chinois - qui ont payé les pots casser - c'etait les Danois ...la coop Arla foods a laisser des plumes consequent avant de voir venir les Kiwi's sur ce terrain ...


deja d'un point de vue geographique il me semble logique que ce marché est facilement accessible pour  les NZ....sans parler de l'ouverture ( certes timide) des portes d'un enorme marché Indien ....


[/quote]


je cite mon propre com pour complementer ....     juste pour mettre un lien que j'avais perdu hiersoir .... www.just-food.com/news/new-fdi-laws-split-indian-parliament_id117478.aspx


ca vient ,ca vient  ce marché est enorme et nettement plus sure et interessante que les Chintocs ....


nb. l'Inde 1ere producteur mondiale du lait .....

Dim 27 Nov 2011 09:45 #16

[quote=patogaz]


ouais , mé mi l' aime bin , chtiot calife du pouéyis d' brun !!!! ilé rétu comme toute !!!!


 


salut ati , tchio calife !!!!  alé , adé , ejminvo !!!!


 


je ne suis pas vache , je traduis pour les non picardisants :


mais moi je l' aime bien , le petit calife du pays de Bray , il est gentil comme tout !!!!


salut à toi , petit calife , allez , au revoir , je m' en vais !!!!


[/quote]


toi  le  grand  calife, je  vais  poster  quelques  co nneries  sur  ton bistrot  pour  défriser  les  proaplistes...............

Dim 27 Nov 2011 10:21 #17

[quote=rivarol]


 


 


Et les bitos aussi 


Dis moi ooouuuuu , j'arrive de suite 


[/quote]


je  vais  te  le  dire, faut  que  je  regarde  un  peu........

Dim 27 Nov 2011 11:17 #18

[quote=Dairy]


 


toi  le  grand  calife, je  vais  poster  quelques  co nneries  sur  ton bistrot  pour  défriser  les  proaplistes...............


[/quote]


 Bonne idée endosse un costume de bricharnophyle convaincu et amuse toi bien, ça fait passer le temps et oublier notre médiocrité et surtout celle de nos élites.


 Mais bon, avec cela ça fait pas avancer non plus 

Jeu 25 Jan 2018 11:01 #19
http://www.entraid.com/articles/a-la-decouverte-du-lait-made-in-nouvelle-zelande

https://twitter.com/jmseronie
Nelle Zélande Fonterra veut augmenter de 8Mds de litres sa production en 7 ans soit 30% ...cela sera beaucoup à l’international sans doute

Centre de recherche Agseach « introduire du maïs dans la ration ..une voie pour ameliorer l efficacité environnementale de l élevage laitier » en Nouvelle
Zelande ou 83% de la ration est pâturée
Ven 2 Mar 2018 22:38 #20

Partager cette discussion sur les réseaux sociaux

Revenir en haut